Cooperative Institute for Climate & Satellites - Maryland

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Andy Harris

Andy Harris is an Assistant Research Scientist in the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center of the University of Maryland since November 2002. His research is focused in three fields - the generation of sea surface temperature products from satellite data, fundamental instrument calibration and characterization in the thermal IR, and development of high-resolution global SST analyses. His BSc is in Physics & Astronomy and his PhD is in Earth Observation. Dr Harris' PhD and post-doctoral work were conducted at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (part of University College London) and is one of the foremost space research laboratories in the UK, where he was involved in the development and testing of calibration and ground support equipment for the European Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR), as well as subsequent algorithm development for exploitation of data from that instrument. His work at the UK Meteorological Office included the development of a system to account for biases in the ATSR due to surface effects, which was adopted by the world-renowned Hadley Centre for Climate Change Research. His recent work has focused on the adaptation and refinement of his methods to work with the current generation of geostationary and polar-orbiting weather satellites operated by NOAA, as well as the development and implementation of a new high-resolution global SST analysis. He is a member of the GHRSST (Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature) Science Team and NPOESS VIIRS Operational Algorithm Team. ctoral work were conducted at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (part of University College London) and is one of the foremost space research laboratories in the UK, where he was involved in the development and testing of calibration and ground support equipment for the European Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR), as well as subsequent algorithm development for exploitation of data from that instrument. His work at the UK Meteorological Office included the development of a system to account for biases in the ATSR due to surface effects, which was adopted by the world-renowned Hadley Centre for Climate Change Research. His recent work has focused on the adaptation and refinement of his methods to work with the current generation of geostationary and polar-orbiting weather satellites operated by NOAA, as well as the development and implementation of a new high-resolution global SST analysis. He is a member of the GHRSST (Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature) Science Team and NPOESS VIIRS Operational Algorithm Team.

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